Free access to NICVA’s Grant Tracker for two weeks

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 6 February 2004 | News Free access to NICVA’s Grant Tracker for two weeks  23 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis To celebrate the first anniversary of Grant Tracker transforming from a CD product to an online service, NICVA is providing free access to the Web site and its database of funders for one week in February 2004.Grant Tracker was launched in February 2003 by NICVA and is designed to help voluntary and community organisations to identify grant makers that will fund projects in Northern Ireland. As well as free news, events and fundraising advice, the site features a database of over 1,000 funders, available to paying subscribers.Annual subscriptions rates are from £80 per annum for a voluntary and community organisation. However, to celebrate its first anniversary and to attract more subscribers, NICVA will allow free access to Grant Tracker for two weeks, from 15 to 29 February 2004. Advertisementcenter_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Tagged with: Community fundraising Digital For details of the userID and password that will get you free temporary access, visit NICVA’s site.last_img read more

New Director of Development at London’s Air Ambulance charity

first_img  17 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Mark Davies has been appointed as Director of Development at London’s Air Ambulance charity. He will be responsible for all fundraising activities, from community fundraising and corporate partnerships to trusts and events.He has worked as a fundraiser for a variety of medical, health and education sectors. He joins from the Centre of the Cell where he was Assistant Director. Before that he was Trust and Foundations Manager at Queen Mary, University London. Davies said: “I joined London’s Air Ambulance because I passionately believe in the charity’s cause, its ability to grow and to expand our income streams. Advertisement Howard Lake | 18 July 2013 | News “The service that our supporters enable us to deliver is unique. No other charity in London does what we do. We are the only provider of advanced pre-hospital medicine in the capital.”He added: “A lot more can be achieved if we manage to dispel some of the misconceptions around the fact that we are a charity and need to raise significant funds. We are reliant on donations and we want the public to know that we need and greatly value their support.” New Director of Development at London’s Air Ambulance charity AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

‘The inauguration of the resistance’

first_imgMarch for immigrant and refugee rights on Jan. 14.Hundreds participated in a Jan. 14 statewide March for Immigrant and Refugee Rights in Milwaukee. Same-day similar actions in over fifty cities by immigrant rights groups across the country declared “the inauguration of the resistance” to the racist, anti-worker threats of the Trump administration.In Milwaukee, the protest and march were supported by the Coalition for an Inclusive Wisconsin, a united front organization representing workers, union members, Muslims, African Americans, women, Jews, the LGBTQ community and others threatened by the new president.Beginning at the offices of Voces de la Frontera and Youth Empowered in the Struggle, participants from Milwaukee, Madison, Racine and other cities in Wisconsin marched to the Milwaukee County Courthouse to demand that families be kept together, mass deportations stop and no Muslim registry be created. The march welcomed refugees and also supported DACA, an Obama presidential order offering some protection to undocumented young people who came to the U.S. as children. (vdlf.orgFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Hermès and scarves: A look at one of the most unique combinations in the west

first_imgAmanda Vasquezhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/amanda-vasquez/ Image Magazine: Spring 2021 Amanda Vasquezhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/amanda-vasquez/ Sustainability is the new green: Fashion companies work towards environmentally-conscious practices Cowgirl: A look at the most glamorous women in rodeo Return of the disco: Latest fashion trends mirror the 1970s Amanda Vasquez ReddIt Facebook Twitter Boschini responds to faculty criticism over recent interview What we’re reading: Request to sequester denied in Chauvin trial, Michigan’s COVID-19 cases rise Amanda Vasquezhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/amanda-vasquez/ Image magazineHermès and scarves: A look at one of the most unique combinations in the westBy Amanda Vasquez – May 3, 2021 622 Non-traditional classrooms to continue to be used next semester as distancing requirements persist Linkedin Previous articleBehind the runway: One TCU student’s experiences at Fashion WeekNext articleCowgirl: A look at the most glamorous women in rodeo Amanda Vasquez printLoading 72%Written by: Amanda Vasquez Photo courtesy of the National Cowgirl Museum in Fort Worth, TXThe massive framed works of art lining the staircases that dominate the grand foyer in the National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame aren’t what they seem. There are no brush marks or paint under the glass, nor are they a view from a photographer’s lens. These intricate and bright pieces are silk scarves depicting horses and other horse-related imagery.A single name stitched into the corner of each – Hermès – marks them as high fashion pieces.The colorful collection is part of a larger exhibition, “It’s Never Just a Horse,” and represents how the only museum in the world dedicated to honoring Western women is about more than horses and trick riding. Photo: The scarves line the stairwell in the museum. (Photo courtesy of the National Cowgirl Museum in Fort Worth, TX)Glamour is woven throughout the museum and its collection. From hand carved panels to a Richard Haas mural, the museum captures the western spirit of women. Sequins, costumes and even more memorabilia are highlights of its second floor, all showcasing the fashion elements of the cowgirl.Photo: Janell Kleberg being inducted into the Cowgirl Hall of Fame (Photo courtesy of the National Cowgirl Museum in Fort Worth, TX)Photo: Janell Kleberg being inducted into the Cowgirl Hall of Fame (Photo courtesy of the National Cowgirl Museum in Fort Worth, TX)Photo: A Richard Haas mural decorates the outside wall of the museum (Photo courtesy of the National Cowgirl Museum in Fort Worth, TX)Photo: A Richard Haas mural decorates the outside wall of the museum (Photo courtesy of the National Cowgirl Museum in Fort Worth, TX)The left stairwell houses an Hermès scarf that was made in collaboration with 2019 Cowgirl Honoree Janell Kleberg. Nominees for the cowgirl award exemplify the courage, resilience and independence that helped shape the West. Kleberg has led a storied career in and around ranch work, and made the scarf as a way to highlight some of the conservation efforts she has been involved in. Kleberg worked with Waco, Texas native and the sole American designer for Hermès, Kermit Oliver, for six years on the scarf. As an avid conservation advocate, Kleberg wanted to create a scarf  that would highlight protecting the Laguna Madre of the Texas Coast.Hermès dedicated a portion of the proceeds of the limited-edition scarf to the Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Research Institute to purchase technology that helps measures annual migrations. That information is then shared with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society, according to the Cowgirl Museum.Photo: Janell Kleberg’s scarf in collaboration with Kermit Oliver (Photo courtesy of the National Cowgirl Museum in Fort Worth, TX)Photo: Colorful scarf depicts beautiful horse imagery (Photo courtesy of the National Cowgirl Museum in Fort Worth, TX)Photo: Colorful scarf depicts beautiful horse imagery (Photo courtesy of the National Cowgirl Museum in Fort Worth, TX)Photo: Janell Kleberg’s scarf in collaboration with Kermit Oliver (Photo courtesy of the National Cowgirl Museum in Fort Worth, TX)Photo: Janell Kleberg’s scarf in collaboration with Kermit Oliver (Photo courtesy of the National Cowgirl Museum in Fort Worth, TX)Photo: Collection of Hermès scarves decorate the walls of the lefthand stairwell (Photo by Amanda Vasquez)Along with Kleberg’s unique piece, the other scarves in the exhibit also have a unique design, color selection and significance that all highlight the value of the horse.“The 16 scarves chosen for this stairwell represent the various partnerships and intersections of the horse, the land and people,” according to the Cowgirl Museum. “You can find elements of the many ways horses have been viewed as partner, competition, muse or simply as an object of beauty, because It’s Never Just a Horse.” Photo: Colorful scarf depicts beautiful horse imagery (Photo courtesy of the National Cowgirl Museum in Fort Worth, TX)Photo: Colorful scarf depicts beautiful horse imagery (Photo courtesy of the National Cowgirl Museum in Fort Worth, TX)Photo: Collection of Hermès scarves decorate the walls of the righthand stairwell (Photo by Amanda Vasquez)Photo: Collection of Hermès scarves decorate the walls of the righthand stairwell (Photo by Amanda Vasquez)This exhibition not only tells the story of the horse, but also the rich history of Hermès.In 1800’s France, the now high fashion company began as a tack company. Wanting to serve customers a wider range of products, the company expanded into selling luxury goods, such as scarves. Each piece goes through a meticulous production process.The elegance, colors, design and sheer size of these Hermès scarves is truly captivating. Madison Ward, public engagement manager at the Cowgirl Museum, explained that executive director Pat Riley came up with the idea to house these scarves. It’s no wonder these scarves are treasured by the Cowgirl Museum and their guests.Amanda Vasquez is a junior journalism major, writing minor at TCU. She is from Westlake Village, California. She is a member of National Association for Hispanic Journalists, HerCampus and Student Media at TCU.TopBuilt with Shorthand Amanda Vasquezhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/amanda-vasquez/ Linkedin ReddIt + posts Vintage fever: Fort Worth residents and vintage connoisseurs talk about their passion for thrifting Twitter Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR What we’re reading: Former Vice President dies at 93, Chad President killed on frontlineslast_img read more

Limerick’s young scientists take 12 awards

first_imgFacebook WhatsApp BUDDING young Limerick scientists took home 12 awards from this year’s BT Young Scientist exhibition. Gaelcholáiste Luimnigh and Castletroy College were the biggest winners with a total of three awards each, closely followed by students from Desmond College who collected two of the prestigious accolades. Hazelwood College, Presentation Secondary School, Coláiste Chiaráin and Ardscoil Ris took home one prize each. Almost 1,200 students from 31 counties took part in this year’s event, which was won by Kinsale Community School in Cork.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Aideen McLoughlin from Gaelcholáiste Luimnigh was awarded first place for a junior individual in the chemical, physical and mathematical category for her study of the pouring characteristics of spouts. Séamas Bulaeir took second place in the biological and ecological sciences for his study of photosynthesis in water plants. The Gaelcholáiste was also recognised for its project on eliminating odours.Ciarán O’Mara from Castletroy College took two awards for his project on portable solar panel trackers. The college also received the Eli Lilly Special Award in the chemical, physical and mathematical category for the study of naturally occurring antiseptic extracts in plants.Desmond College won two highly commended awards for projects on Heavy duty hover pads and a self-leveling wheelbarrow.Hazelwood College came up trumps in the social and behavioural category for its study an attitudes and perceptions towards science in County Limerick. Sarah Little from Presentation Secondary School was highly commended for her project on first impressions in the same category.Ardscoil Ris was recognised for its ‘app to save a life’ project, while Coláiste Chiaráin scored for its device on improving timing in rowing boats.Now in its 49th year, the BT Young Scientist & Technology Exhibition attracted more than 45,000 visitors to the RDS in Dublin last week.Colm O’Neill BT CEO with Killian Ryan, Emmett Ryan & Michael Fitzgibbon from Ardscoil Ris, Limerick with their Project Eye on the Ball : An App to save a life at the BT Young Scientist and Technology Exhibition 2013.Photo Chris Bellew Advertisement NewsLocal NewsLimerick’s young scientists take 12 awardsBy admin – January 21, 2013 628 Emailcenter_img Previous articleHunt for airport boss gets under wayNext articleLimerick solicitor owes €70 million admin Twitter Linkedin Printlast_img read more

John Downey homecoming event defended by Sinn Fein

first_img Twitter Sinn Fein have defended a homecoming event organised for John Downey in Donegal tonight.An event is to be held in the Lagoon Bar in Termon, Kilmacrenan, where up to 500 people are expected to attend.A number of high profile members of Sinn Fein such as Martin McGuinness, Gerry Kelly, Pearse Doherty and Padraig MacLochlainn are expected to attend.Donegal North-East Deputy, Padraig MacLochlainn says it was John Downey’s family and friends who organised the event and not Sinn Fein, however he says they have every right to welcome him home:[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/pad10.mp3[/podcast] Google+ Previous articleAssembly motion criticises SF and British Government over “On The Run” lettersNext articleDonegal to be allocated 1.3m euro for storm damage News Highland Pinterest Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North By News Highland – March 1, 2014 Google+ Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal John Downey homecoming event defended by Sinn Fein WhatsAppcenter_img WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR News Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Facebook Twitter Pinterest Facebook Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firelast_img read more

Woman who allegedly stabbed 5 people in birthing center charged with attempted murder

first_imgmoodboard/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The woman who allegedly stabbed five people, including three babies, in a birthing center has been charged with attempted murder, the NYPD said Saturday.Yu Fen Wang, 52, was hit with five counts of attempted murder for allegedly stabbing five people in what authorities described as a birthing center, which didn’t appear to be licensed with New York City or the state, officials said.Wang, who had what appeared to be self-inflicted slash wounds on her left wrist, remained hospitalized Saturday, according to the NYPD. Wang allegedly went into the facility in the Flushing neighborhood of the city’s borough of Queens about 4 a.m. Friday and stabbed five people, including the infants, who ranged in age from 3 days to 1-month-old, police said.The victims were expected to survive, police said. Investigators recovered two knives at the scene.A motive has not been determined and the investigation was still active, the NYPD said Saturday.Local and state officials said a probe into the facility, which may have provided maternity care or hospitality services for the largely Chinese immigrant community, had begun. The investigation was looking into the legality of the center, too, officials said.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Seriously wasted

first_imgWith landfill tax now costing £32 a tonne and set to rise by £8/tonne every year until 2012, business is facing an inflation-busting bill for its waste.And disposal is, in fact, just the tip of the iceberg; the cost of waste also includes raw materials, management time, processing and transport costs, labour costs, energy costs, and the reduction in productivity caused by producing waste. Trade association the British Retail Consortium reckons that reducing waste can save you costs equal to 1% of turnover.But in the face of these numbers, the food industry still dumps 12.6 million tonnes (mt) of waste every year, out of the UK’s 72mt total (according to the Environment Agency).So why, with the financial argument seemingly so persuasive, isn’t everyone in the industry protecting their bottom line? And how are the most forward-thinking operators in the café sector, from the big branded cafés to traditional high-street operators benefiting from tackling rubbish?Pret A Manger, Oliver Adams and Greggs are among those businesses that have made waste control a priority. Sandwich chain Pret A Manger’s flagship policy is sending its leftovers to homeless charities. Sustainability manager Nicky Fisher says the 180-shop chain donates 1.7 million items of leftover food to charities every year, vastly reducing its landfill bill to £400,000, and also making its contribution to local good causes.Meanwhile, 28-shop Northampton craft chain Oliver Adams has saved itself £23,000 a year by introducing a tranche of measures to reduce the amount of waste it sends to landfill by 70%. One of its many initiatives is sending food waste to be processed into electricity at a biogas plant. Stores manager Phil Race says the chain’s reputation for environmental best-practice now attracts fact-finders to its bakery: “We are always looking to save in every single way possible, there is always something more you can do.”Greggs, the UK’s largest bakery retail chain with more than 1,350 outlets, says its target is to reduce landfill by 50% of the 2006 base, by 2010, “depending on commercial factors”. Measures in place to reduce food wastage include a handful of second-day shops, typically in the suburbs or on an industrial estate. These sell goods that are one day old at cut prices, such as ’dry’ cakes, bread and rolls, but no chilled products, for safety reasons.They might also sell some fresh products that would otherwise be left over from the local Greggs’ bakery.Many smaller retail bakers have also cracked it when it comes to leftovers. Two-shop Stott’s Bakers & Confectioners, based in Blackburn, for example, reuses leftovers wherever possible – cake crumbs in trifles, for example. And good old-fashioned neighbourliness also comes into play in controlling waste: “We recycle; we have an arrangement with the Co-op next door. It uses our yard and we use its recycling cages for cardboard and paper. We scratch their backs, they scratch ours!” says owner Geoffrey Stott.So, with so many smart and money-saving ideas on tackling waste in use by bakery retailers across the UK, why is it that the industry produces more than 12mt of food waste?British Sandwich Association director Jim Winship says that waste control can be difficult and counter-productive: “The biggest losses tend to be in chasing reductions in waste. Unfortunately, what tends to happen is that retailers seek to reduce wastage by savagely cutting back on the amount of product they have on display – with the result that while wastage may drop, so do sales. Before you know it, you have lost more through lost sales than the wastage was costing!”The key to success on waste control, he says, is to ruthlessly monitor how individual products perform: keep close track of which products sell, when they sell (time of day and year) and what influences sales (from day of the week to weather pattern), then stock accordingly, maximising sales, minimising waste. However, in the fresh food retail business, 5% wastage is to be expected, he says.An independent report commissioned by environmentally friendly refrigeration supplier Gram, published in April, gives some further clues on why food businesses are still getting to grips with waste. The ’Green Paper’ looks at 688 foodservice operators – pubs, caterers and restaurants – and their position on green issues. Nearly three-quarters of those surveyed said making their business greener was a high priority. But barriers cited included issues with council waste collections, getting people involved and even laziness.Need for cohesive actionMany operators do blame patchy and piecemeal nationwide provision of recycling services by local councils. Pret A Manger admits it spent three years working out an in-store recycling policy due to lack of uniform recycling provision across the UK. A Starbucks spokeswoman says waste control is a high priority, but the company has not been able to find a waste contractor that can service its 500-plus outlets nationwide in a commercially viable fashion.Many businesses admit the commercial goalposts have moved, as cutting waste travels up national and EU agendas. Landfill tax had been rising £3/tonne a year, but started rising by £8/tonne each year from April this year, “to encourage recycling”, according to the announcement in the 2007 Budget. That came as the government suggested that EU landfill targets to 2020 were “challenging”.As the financial thumbscrews turn, the growing cost of waste looks set to stir even those who confess to being lazy about tackling this issue. Whether it is by turning leftover sponges into trifle or donating leftover sandwiches to homeless shelters, the economics of waste reduction are set to get ever more persuasive. Waste management is no longer just for the Wombles.Next issue: waste case studies—-=== Landfill tax ===The diversion of waste from landfill is a key objective under the EU Landfill Directive. By 2010, biodegradable waste going to landfill must be 75% of the amount disposed in 1995; by 2013 this must be reduced to 50%; and by 2020 to 35%.The standard rate of landfill tax in the UK is increasing by £8/tonne a year. This rate applies to active wastes (those that give off emissions such as rotting food). It went up from £24 to £32 in April and will continue to rise up to £48/tonne in 2010/11. A lower rate of £2.50/tonne currently applies to inactive wastes.—-=== How to tackle waste ===l Understand where waste is arising in the process, where it is coming from, and how much it is really costingl Calculate the true cost of waste, including raw material waste, energy, transport and labour costs. Finding that waste costs 10-20 times as much as waste disposal can move waste up the agenda, so it becomes a management issue, not just environmentall Segregate waste materials for recycling such as paper, plastics and cooking oill Work with suppliers to ensure the packaging received on raw materials is recyclable, returnable or reusablel Buying in bulk can reduce packaging and costs—-=== Where to get help ===l Envirowise: [http://www.envirowise.gov.uk]l The Environment Agency: [http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk]l Scottish Energy Efficiency Office: [http://www.sepa.org.uk]l Northern Ireland Environment and Heritage Service: [http://www.ehsni.gov.uk]l SWAP: [http://www.swap-web.co.uk]l Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP): [http://www.wrap.org.uk]l The Composting Association: [http://www.compost.org.uk]l Business Link: [http://www.businesslink.org.uk]—-=== Baking industry summit ===In no other industry is food baked daily, packed daily, distributed daily and sold or thrown away – daily! While consumer wastage far outweighs manufacturers’ waste, bakers are under pressure to examine their operations and become as sustainable as possible. On 27 November, British Baker will host a summit on how to incorporate socially responsible practices into your business. The conference will examine what government, consumers and the supermarkets are asking for. Speakers already confimed include TNS director Ed Garner and a keynote speaker is Huw Edwards, the commercial director for bakery and cafés at Asda.Who should attend?: plant, craft and wholesale bakeries, ingredients suppliers, supermarkets. equipment providers. [http://www.bakingsummit.co.uk]—-=== How to set up a waste reduction programme ===l Have commitment from senior managementl Have personnel who are dedicated to the introduction and development of the programmel Involve staff at all levels in the programmel Allocate resources to the programme to enable actions to be carried outl Accurately measure information to enable management of the programmel Identify prioritiesl Provide reliable, credible and timely reporting for feedback, monitoring and targeting purposesl Regularly review progress and set future prioritiesl Communicate the programme’s successes to interested parties, eg, staff, directors and customersSource: [http://www.envirowise.gov.uk]last_img read more

Press release: Government pledges £1 Million in response to ITV’s Help our Helplines campaign

first_imgMinister for Mental Health, Nadine Dorries said: £1 Million donated by the Government in response to ITV’s Help our Helplines campaign Funding will be allocated to mental health charities helplines as part of the Coronavirus Mental Health Response Fund Fundraising appeal to feature tonight as part of ITV’s Britain’s Got Talent I know how difficult this pandemic has been for so many, particularly those with pre-existing mental health conditions. ITV’s Help Our Helplines campaign has done an incredible job of shining a light on the important work of mental health charities across the country and this funding will go a long way to helping people in their darkest moments. This unprecedented pandemic has changed life as we know it, and will have understandably caused or added to the concerns and hardship of those suffering from mental health conditions. Mental health charities do an amazing job of working alongside the NHS to support those who need it, when they need it. I am delighted to be able to extend support for these charities on World Mental Health Day, by £1 million to mental health charities in response to ITV’s Help Our Helplines campaign. This £1 million donation from the Department of Health and Social Care is a real boost to ITV’s Britain Get Talking Help Our Helplines campaign. The number of people looking for help has risen significantly as it continues to be a challenging time for many. We are grateful to the Government for recognising our campaign with this generous pledge. It will help mental health charity helplines continue to offer their support to everyone who needs their help;center_img This will fund mental health helplines, which are able to provide direct access to information, emotional support and other services. There are a range of helplines offering support, including condition specific helplines, local helplines, and support for particular groups and communities.ITV chief executive Carolyn McCall said: Inspired by ITV’s Help Our Helplines campaign, the Government is donating £1 million to charities across the country through the Coronavirus Mental Health Response Fund, administered by Mind.The donation will be announced during the final episode of hit ITV programme Britain’s Got Talent, airing tonight.The extra £1 million of Government funding comes as part of a package of support for the mental health sector on World Mental Health Day, including £2 million for research into the effects of COVID-19 on the mental health of at risk groups, and over £400 million to eradicate dormitories in mental health facilities in England.Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock said: ITV’s Help Our Helplines campaign launched on 5 October which will end with a final fundraising call on tonight Britain’s Got Talent final to mark World Mental Health Day. It is supporting the helplines of Mind, YoungMinds, CALM and SamH.The campaign aims to raise funding through public donations to support mental health charity helplines during Covid-19, so that no call goes unanswered.The Government has given £5 million to the Coronavirus Mental Health Response Fund, established in March, reaching over 130 mental health charities including BEAT and Mind. This is on top of a further £4.2 million to other mental health charities across the country.last_img read more

LSD Residue On 1960s Synth Sends Repair Tech On Accidental “Trip” [Watch]

first_imgLysergic Acid Diethylamide, more commonly known amongst the cool kids as “LSD,” has been the culprit of countless wild adventures since its psychedelic properties were accidentally discovered by Swiss chemist Albert Hofman in 1938. One of the more recent stories involving the hallucinogenic drug brings back memories of the San Francisco music scene of the 1960s, when musicians and adventurous minds alike would use LSD for liberation from the squares of normal society.According to a fascinating new report from San Francisco-based news outlet KPIX 5, one of their own Broadcast Operations Managers recently stumbled upon a vintage Buchla Model 100 synthesizer. While attempting to repair it, the technician unexpectedly ingested a dose of LSD from residue which had apparently remained on the digital instrument from many years ago.Related: Read Butch Trucks’ Acid-Fueled Story About When ABB & Grateful Dead Members Played NYE In 1973Last year, a technician manager named Eliot Curtis had volunteered to repair a vintage synth owned by Cal State East Bay. The instrument was initially brought into the university’s ownership by a pair of avant-garde musicians who taught in the school’s music department back in the 1960s. The synth eventually fell out of favor with the curriculum and was stored in a cool, dark closet where it was left for decades—allowing for the ideal conditions for keeping LSD’s potency intact over a long period of time.While attempting to repair the old piece of music equipment, Curtis discovered a crystalline-like residue stuck under one of the knobs and attempted to remove it using his fingers. It turns out that residue was leftover LSD from the bygone era, and within an hour Curtis had begun to feel the effects of the mind-altering substance. What began as tingling in his fingers eventually stuck around for nine hours as Curtis continued to feel how the drug was impacting his nervous system. Fun times, right?Hear the entire story in the video below.KPIX 5 – Synth Repair Leads To LSD Trip Report[Video: KPIX 5]Don Buchla, the inventor of the Buchla Model 100 and known user of LSD in the 1960s, happened to be friends with Grateful Dead sound tech and LSD supplier, Owsley “The Bear” Stanley. It hasn’t been confirmed whether the LSD that got into Curtis bloodstream by way of skin contact came from the same legendary supply cooked up by Stanley, but it certainly makes for a fun possibility to think about during your next trip.At the very least, the report should bring an optimistic smile to the faces of Deadheads to know that some of the high-quality, pure LSD which circulated around the San Francisco area back then, is still around and active in some hidden parts of the world in 2019.[H/T KPIX 5]last_img read more