Robinson was right on new head of CIA

first_imgIt’s extremely rare that I can agree with columnist Eugene Robinson, but in the case of his opposition to the nominee for the CIA, I agree that you don’t reward “authors of torture.”Eugene SpicerScotiaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationSchenectady teens accused of Scotia auto theft, chase; Ended in Clifton Park crash, Saratoga Sheriff…Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img

Experiment shows need for a dam gate

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion Letters to the editor from Russ Wege on March 4 and James Duggan on March 5 regarding the solutions proposed to address the flooding of the Mohawk River were right on target. You can see the results by doing a simple test with a faucet, sink, stopper-drain valve and an overflow drain hole.Think of the faucet as the river, the sink as “Lake Schenectady,” as I call it, the stopper-drain valve as the gates or siphon (like they use at the Gilboa Dam), and the overflow hole as the dam. With the stopper-valve closed, fill the sink with water like the river until it just flows out of the overflow hole. The faucet lets the water flow out of the overflow hole like to does over the dam. Turn the faucet on more to make the river raise the water level to flood stage. By opening the stopper-drain valve, the water level drops below the dam to a safe level to stop the flooding. One can also dredge the channel in the river to make the water flow out faster.There may be a problem with the New York Power Authority and the Canal Corporation not wanting to spend all the money that it would cost to do this. The Power Authority could also install low-flow generators so they wouldn’t have to keep the river high.In addition, all the money spent on meetings held, after-flood cleanup and safety warnings to get people to leave the area could all be spent on prevention to permanently resolve this issue and perhaps even clean up the river. Meanwhile, we will have to wait and see how long it will take to fix the problem.EDWARD SCHAPERJAHNGlenvilleMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuslast_img read more

An outside chance

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Housing pays at Taywood

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Rail Property’s tenanted office lots raise £900,000

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Rich pickings

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Developing at a premium

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

PREMIUMMajor flood paralyzes Jakarta, forces thousands to evacuate

first_imgLinkedin LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Google Log in with your social account Topics : Forgot Password ? Facebook Heavy rains that battered Jakarta two days in a row caused citywide flooding on Tuesday, throwing the capital city into disarray and inhibiting transportation.Several commuter line trains, Transjakarta buses and Jak Lingko (public minivan) routes serving Greater Jakarta had already been disrupted for two consecutive days. Tuesday’s flooding made the disruptions worse.Commuter Line trains serving the Bekasi to Kota, Bogor to Kota and Bogor/Depok to Angke/Jatinegara routes had to stop at Manggarai Station, while trains serving the Bekasi to Kota route stopped at Pasar Senen Station.The electricity supply to 20 Transjakarta bus stops was cut on Tuesday morning, disabling electric ticket readers. Twenty-two Transjakarta bus routes and 14 Jak Lingko routes were suspended, while 12 other routes were diverted on Tuesday morning. The majority of Transjakarta bus routes had resume… Jakarta-flood flood inundation flood-mitigation transjakarta commuter-line commuter-trains Transportation school power-cutlast_img read more

Black Democrats turn their backs on Bloomberg at church before Super Tuesday votes

first_imgBiden and Bloomberg are trying to present themselves as the party’s best choice to take on Trump, arguing that Sanders is too far to the left to win the general election.At church in Selma, the vice president to the country’s first African American president, Barack Obama, was clearly the favorite. Biden was seated in a place of honor with the pastor, facing the pews where Bloomberg sat, and got a glowing introduction from U.S. Representative Terri Sewell, a black Alabama lawmaker who supports him.”Most importantly, he has earned the right to be in this pulpit and to address you now,” Sewell said.Democratic contenders Elizabeth Warren and Amy Klobuchar sat on folding chairs at the margins of the church audience. The pastor yelled at Tom Steyer, who dropped out of the race after finishing third in South Carolina, to sit down. “This is a house of God, this is not a political rally,” he chided.The candidates were in Selma to mark the 55th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday,” when civil rights marchers were beaten by state troopers and local police while crossing a bridge in Selma.Bloomberg skipped the first four state nominating contests including South Carolina but has blanketed the nation with about $500 million in advertising and will be on the ballot for the first time on Tuesday, when the biggest prizes are California and Texas.He has made a concerted effort to reach out to black voters, including apologies for overseeing an increase in the use of a police practice called “stop and frisk” in New York City that disproportionately affected black and other racial minority residents. A federal judge found the practice was an unconstitutional form of racial profiling.A Reuters/Ipsos poll of registered Democrats and independents, conducted Feb. 19-25, showed Bloomberg garnering the support of 20% of black voters, third among the Democratic candidates behind Sanders (26%) and Biden (23%).At least five Super Tuesday states – Alabama, North Carolina, Tennessee, Arkansas and Virginia – have big blocs of African-American voters.’NOT A SOCIALIST’Biden won overwhelmingly in South Carolina, drawing 48% of the votes cast compared to 20% for Sanders. Edison Research exit polls showed Biden with 61% of African-American support there to Sanders’ 17%.The victory led the former vice president to assert himself as a viable moderate alternative to Sanders, an independent U.S. senator from Vermont and self-described democratic socialist.Sanders’ calls for a political revolution have rattled a Democratic Party establishment worried he is too far to the left to beat Trump.”I think the Democratic Party is looking for a Democrat – not a socialist, not a former Republican, a Democrat – to be their nominee,” Biden told “Fox News Sunday.”Biden’s reference to a former Republican appears to have been aimed at Bloomberg, who switched parties.Sanders attacked Biden for taking contributions from political organizations called Super PACs and billionaires, courting wealthy donors at what he said was the expense of working-class, middle-class and low-income people.”I don’t go to rich people’s homes like Joe Biden,” Sanders said on CBS’s “Face the Nation.”Biden lags Sanders in fundraising and organization in Super Tuesday states and beyond.Sanders planned to campaign on Sunday in heavily Democratic California, where he leads opinion polls.The Sanders campaign announced overnight it had raised $46.5 million from more than 2.2 million donations in February, a huge sum dwarfing what any other Democratic candidate had raised last year in any three-month period.Biden reported his February haul was $18 million. Warren’s campaign said she raised more than $29 million last month.Bloomberg, meanwhile, continues to spend. He purchased three minutes of commercial air time during on broadcast networks CBS and NBC on Sunday evening to address the coronavirus outbreak.Topics : “I was hurt, I was disappointed,” Strong said as Bloomberg looked on stonily. “I think it’s important that he came, and it shows a willingness on his part to change.”About 10 people stood up and turned their backs on Bloomberg as he spoke about racial inequality. Black voters are a key constituency of the Democratic Party.”I think it’s just an insult for him to come here. It’s the disrespect for the legacy of this place,” Lisa Brown, who traveled to Selma from Los Angeles, told Reuters later. She said the idea to protest Bloomberg’s remarks had circulated but she stood as an individual, not an organized group.The quiet protest suggests Bloomberg may have an uphill climb with some African-American voters, who have supported Biden in large numbers and carried him to a resounding victory in South Carolina. Joe Biden, fresh off a victory in South Carolina propelled by black voters, on Sunday commemorated a landmark civil rights march in Alabama, where some worshippers at an African-American church turned their backs on his rival Michael Bloomberg.Biden and the others competing for the Democratic nomination to challenge Republican President Donald Trump in November hit the campaign trail before Super Tuesday nominating contests in 14 states including Alabama. Biden, whose win in Saturday’s South Carolina primary galvanized his campaign, and the current front-runner, Bernie Sanders, traded jabs on Sunday news shows.Bloomberg, a former New York mayor, received a chilly reception at the historic Brown Chapel AME Church in Selma after pastor Reverend Leodis Strong told the gathering the billionaire businessman initially had turned down the invitation to speak.last_img read more

Aviva announces exit, sells entire stake in Indonesian joint venture

first_imgBritish insurance company Aviva Holding Ltd. has announced its exit from Indonesia, selling all its shares in its joint venture in the country, PT Astra Aviva Life (Astra Life), to its partner, PT Astra International.Aviva released the statement on the company’s website on Friday.“The transaction is expected to be completed in quarter four of 2020 and is subject to certain closing conditions, including regulatory approval in Indonesia and the completion of Bangkok Bank Public Company Limited’s [Bangkok Bank] acquisition of PT Bank Permata Tbk [Permata Bank], Aviva Indonesia’s bancassurance partner,” the statement said. The shareholders of Bangkok Bank approved the acquisition of Permata Bank on March 5.Bangkok Bank announced in December that it had agreed to buy 89.1 percent of stakes in publicly listed Bank Permata from Standard Chartered and Astra International for around US$2.67 billion as part of its overseas expansion.Read also: Bangkok Bank to acquire another Indonesian bank after Permata deal: OJKBritish financial giant Standard Chartered and Indonesian diversified conglomerate PT Astra International were the majority owners of Bank Permata shares, each owning 44.56 percent. Astra Life was established on May 26, 2014, and by 2018 it had over 750 employees and provided services to over 1.4 million customers, according to information on the company’s website. The company had total assets amounting to Rp 5.9 trillion (US$407 million) in the fourth quarter of 2019, a Rp 900 billion year-on-year growth, according to its financial statement.Aviva began a review of its Asia business in 2019 under new CEO Maurice Tulloch, Reuters reported.The company said in November that it had decided to keep its Singapore and China operations, but was considering options for its Indonesia, Vietnamese and Hong Kong businesses. (mpr)Topics :last_img read more